Spring pocket mattress
From now until 4 March if you trade in an old bed or mattress at Co-op Beds, you’ll get cashback towards a new one – up to £150, depending on the size.

Your old bed will also be disposed of in an environmentally friendly way, saving you the hassle of getting rid of it too.

An even better deal if you use your double discount

Colleagues get 5% discount at Co-op Beds all year round, which is doubled to 10% during double discount dates –  the next one is 16/17 February.

Join the conversation! 11 Comments

  1. @Transparent

    I think you are making that list up

    Reply
  2. Re bed bug

    I couldn’t agree more, and the last I knew water was not a harmful Chemical

    Reply
  3. Still confused by this deal with silentnight.

    Unsure where the co-op difference is? Wheres the value add?

    Reply
  4. Transparent has too much time on his or her hands .

    Reply
  5. This site is still very miss-leading. If you filter for Double beds, you are taken to a page titled ‘Silentnight Double Beds – 4’6″ ‘. If you then select a bed from the range (I chose one with prices from £449.69), it asks you to select the size you want – odd, since I am viewing the page stating DOUBLE BEDS. Just watch the price jump by £200 when you select double bed from this new drop down box. It makes the filters and the page headers completely meaningless.

    Reply
  6. And don’t let the bed bugs bite either..

    Reply
  7. What makes this a “Co-op Bed”. Are the materials ethically sourced. Below is just a short-list of the chemicals used in making a mattress. Are we ensuring that where possible we are maximising our green credentials to reduce the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOG’s) that go into the manufacture of mattresses.

    4-Aminobiphenyl
    4-trans-pentyl-cyclohexyl
    1,1,1, 2-Tetrachloroethane
    2-chloro-1,3-butadiene
    acetone
    Acrylate resins
    Asbestos Fluorinated polymers
    Azoxylbenzene
    Benzonitrile
    Beryllium and Compounds
    Carbon tetrachloride
    Cellulose nitrate plastic polymers
    Chlorofluorocarbons
    Chloroform
    Chromium and compounds
    Cobalt and compounds
    Cone essence
    Cynanide
    Dimethylformamide
    Dioxins and furans
    Diphenyl diisocyanate
    Emulsion of Hevea brasiliensis milk in water
    Epichlorohydrin
    Fats
    Glycol ethers
    Halogenated benzenes
    Halogenated napthalenes
    Halogenated triphenyls
    Halons
    Haologenated idphenyl ethers
    Hevea brasiliensis milk
    Hexachlorobutadiene
    Hydrolyzed corn
    Indium
    Lead carbonate
    Lead hydrocarbonate
    Lead sulfate
    Magnesium
    Metallic oxides
    Methyl benzene (toluene)
    Methylene dianiline
    Molybdenum
    Organo-tin compounds
    Perfluorocarbons Benzene
    Phenol-melamine resins
    Phenol-urea
    Phenylcyclohexane Benzidine
    Polychlorinated phenols
    Polyvinyl acetate
    Rhenium
    Rubidium
    Samarium
    Strontium
    Sulfur
    Tellerium
    Thallium and compounds
    toluene diisocyanate
    toluene–neoprene
    Vinilideine chloride
    Vinyl acetate
    Water
    Waxes styrene-butadiene copolymer

    Reply

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